128 documents
Unless otherwise specified, the descriptions of sources in this section are extracted from Pierre-Etienne Will and collaborators,Official Handbooks and Anthologies of Imperial China: A Descriptive and Critical Bibliography (Leiden: Brill, forthcoming).
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Description
documentTypeBook
TitleFanshan pipan 樊山批判 [Answers and Judgments by Fan Zengxiang]
Topic2.2 Judicial cases: Local casebooks
Historical periodLate Qing (1797-1911)
CountryChinese
Reprint (year of)2005
AuthorFan zengxiang 樊增祥
CollectionLidai panli pandu 歷代判例判牘
Volume12
Number of volume11
Publisher中国社会科学出版社
Place of publication北京
Publication typePrint
Abstract

A collection of answers (pi 批, j. 1-14) and sentences (pan 判, j. 15) handed down by the author (who insists that he wrote them in his own hand) during a decade spent as an official, starting in 1887. The pi, which are not dated, are rarely longer than one 276-character page; they deal with every kind of “civil” affairs or conflicts and perfectly illustrate the magistrate in his role as “educator” admonishing his “children”; the captions give the name of the plaintiff but do not indicate the nature of the case. The ten pan in j. 15 are comparatively longer, and the captions are more suggestive of the contents. [Revoir la préface]

Comment

A collection of answers (批, j. 1-14) and judgments (判, j. 15) handed down by the author (who insists that he wrote them in his own hand). Fan explains that in his first positions (down to 1887) he did not keep copies of his rescripts. Only from the resumption of his career in Shaanxi in 1891 did he order scribes to make copies of them; he had been urged to do so during his stay in the capital in 1890-91 by such famous friends as Li Ciming 李慈銘—who said that Fan’s rescripts could be used as a “guide to a horse” 前馬 by beginning officials—and Shen Zipei 沈子培; but when he moved from Xianning 咸寧 to Weinan 渭南 he found that a large part of his archive had disappeared. The documents in the present collection represent about ten percent of his output during his four years of tenure in Weinan. The pi, which are not dated, are rarely longer than one 276-character page; they deal with every kind of “civil” affairs or conflicts and perfectly illustrate the magistrate in his role as an educator admonishing his “children”; the captions give the name of the plaintiff but do not indicate the nature of the case. The 10 judgments in j. 15, which are also rich in social content and in Fan’s admonitions to those on trial, are comparatively longer, and the captions are more suggestive of the contents. (They are the same as those at the end of j. 4 of Fanshan pandu.) Fan explains in the preface that the much larger number of pi is due to the fact that he wrote them all by himself as soon as the litigants’ requests were submitted; in contrast, he would only write personally the pan in complicated and important affairs (such as those collected in the work), but allowed clerks to record the testimonies and draft the judgment, not adding anything to it if their work seemed acceptable.

SubjectLaw
LanguageChinese
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