119 documents
Unless otherwise specified, the descriptions of sources in this section are extracted from Pierre-Etienne Will and collaborators,Official Handbooks and Anthologies of Imperial China: A Descriptive and Critical Bibliography (Leiden: Brill, forthcoming).
52/119 results        
Description
documentTypeBook
TitleLuxiang gongdu 廬鄉公牘
Topic4.1 Magistrates handbooks: General
Historical periodLate Qing (1797-1911)
AuthorZhuang Lunyi 莊綸裔
CollectionGuanzhen shu jicheng 官箴書集成
Number of volume9
Publication typeWoodblock
CommentRem.: A collection of documents composed by Zhuang Lunyi during his tenure as magistrate of Laiyang 萊陽 (Shandong), published with the encouragment of his former superior Wu Junsun, who was appointed prefect of Dengzhou 登州 in 1903. While many of the documents are undated, those which can be dated were written between 1900 and 1901. A number of documentary formats are represented, including formal reports to superiors (bing), informal reports to superiors (xiangwen), letters (han), public pronouncements (gaowen), responses (pi) to commoners’ petitions (bing or cheng), and judicial decisions (tangpan). J. 1 consists in part of reports written by Zhuang to Shandong governor Yuan Shikai (and, in many cases, includes Yuan’s responses) on topics related to the courrier service, sectarianism, and criminal investigations. These are followed by reports (bing) to other superior officials with jurisdiction over Laiyang, including the prefect of Dengzhou and the Donghai guandao 東海關道. The last part of j. 1 and the first part of j. 2 consist of informal reports to superiors (xiangwen), most of which discuss issues related to litigation and other judicial issues. J. 2 continues with letters (han) to similarly ranked colleagues concerning issues such as sectarianism, regional commerce, and criminal prosecution. They are followed by public pronouncements (gaowen) on subjects including pettifogging, illegal collection of baolan payments, and improper conduct by shengyuan. J. 2 ends and j. 3 begins with official responses (pi) to judicial complaints, reports, and petitions submitted by commoners and underlings. The remainder of j. 3 and all of j. 4 are devoted to judicial decisions (tangpan).  The “supplement” (buyi) consists of a single report to the Shandong governor, Yuan Shikai, and a response from Yuan’s successor.
SubjectLaw
LanguageChinese
file attachment

Guangzhen_vol09_part12.pdf (7.48 Mo)

or read document on line in a new window

52/119 results